Help! My Dog’s Eyes Are Red

chihuahua dogThere are many reasons why your dog’s eyes may develop a condition in which they appear light- to bright red. This color change can be caused by an injury, illness, or even possibly a disease. It’s important to pay attention to changes in your pet’s body so that you can report to your veterinarian any noticeable issues before a serious problem occurs. If your dog is prone to a slight red tinge of color in his or her eye, this shouldn’t alert you; however, if your pet’s eyes are red and that is a new factor, you should check with their veterinarian immediately.

The most common causes for red eyes in dogs are conjunctivitis and trauma. Both of which will need attention from your dog’s doctor. If your dog experiences a sudden trauma to the eye, such as hitting it against something or getting debris inside of the eyelid, your dog’s eyes will invariably get red from irritation, and will need to be examined and treated by a veterinarian.

If your dog has not recently experienced a trauma, and you’re noticing a watery or mucus-like discharge leaking from your dog’s eyes, there’s a good chance your dog has conjunctivitis, also commonly referred to as pink eye. When the conjunctival membrane becomes inflamed, your dog’s eyes will change coloration due to the irritation. Depending on the type of conjunctivitis, your dog may or may not need medicine. Reach out to your veterinarian for guidance, and keep your dog’s eyes free from discharge in the meantime.

While conjunctivitis and trauma are the leading causes for sudden eye-color change in dogs, there are other reasons why your dog’s eyes may appear red. Has your dog ever been tested for allergies? Our pets are also susceptible to outdoor allergens and may suffer from seasonal allergies. These allergens may either dry out your dog’s eyes or irritate them. A trip to the vet is all you’ll need to help your allergic pooch. They can prescribe medication to alleviate the symptoms your allergic dog is experiencing.

If you’re unable immediately to visit your veterinarian’s office, there is some action you can take at home to make sure your pooch’s eyes do not get worse. Without touching the eye itself, gently wipe down the area of the eye, especially if there is discharge coming from the eye. Try not to touch the eye, as this could worsen the irritation. If you find your dog is pawing at his eye, invest in a collar that will keep him from getting at his face. If your dog will allow it, a warm compress might alleviate the pain from irritation as well, but not in all cases.

Monitoring your dog at all times is a great way to be able to report your dog’s activity and changes in behavior when you are able to visit your vet.


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